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Blog Campaign, Guest Posts, Learning at its Best

Occupy Education Today! (Guest Post by Hannah Faye)

The Occupy Movement which began on Wall Street has now spread to many parts of the country with individual occupy movements popping up all over the place. When I saw the diversity of the movement and how it was growing back in September 2011, I knew it wouldn’t be long before educators started occupying as well. Because wherever there are individual thinkers there is always potential energy to bring about a change. And wherever that kind of potential energy exists, there is room for an occupy movement.

But what makes Occupy Education most important? The fact that this occupy movement is about education, of course…a profession from which all the other ones stem. That is why it is most important.

Education is the key to a prosperous nation and world, so doesn’t it make sense for change to begin there? But what must be changed about our educational system? One thing we know for sure and that is, it cannot continue in the same way it has evolved. Especially, when less than 20% of seniors in some states will graduate this year. When students can spend 8-10 hours in school and still come home not knowing how to read or write, it clearly isn’t working.

In Chicago, Mayor Emanuel and the Superintendent of Chicago Public Schools most recently joined forces to push for longer school hours, but this isn’t the solution at all. Real educators know that it is not so much the length of time that goes into a child’s learning, but what is done within that amount of time that makes the most difference. If kids are bouncing around from subject to subject all day how will they ever be able to retain any knowledge at all? They’re not given enough time to fully grasp a concept before it’s time to move on to the next thing. Middle and high school students take several classes a day and for each transition to the next class they still have to shuffle around books that weigh a ton and are nearly that much old. Yes, that much old!

Here’s another thing. Why are parents given so many opportunities to share their thoughts yet none of them are hardly implemented by the schools? When did parents lose control over their child’s education? When did teachers lose control over how they teach? Instead, they are underpaid, overworked and so disgruntled that sooner or later it becomes evident in their performance. I haven’t even begun to scratch the surface.

It is my opinion, that because Occupy Education effects the whole world everyone should be involved in some way. It should overflow with teachers, parents and students, not only with their complaints, but with logical solutions to the problems.

Just think about this for a moment: in one day, if all teachers took a stand and stayed home, if all parents did the same thing and kept their children home…what message would that send to the government about the needs? How quickly would they get the message? This is the power we have when we toss aside our personal agendas for the moment and unify as a collective body for the future. This is the power we have when we choose to stop being controlled and start taking back the control and right to our own education!

-Hannah Faye

Educator, Author of Occupy the World: From the Heart of the Protesters

Find more Occupy Education posts here and join us in Occupying Education!

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————–I I was born in Chicago, Illinois. My love and passion will always be there even though my feet may take me some where else. I became a teacher, hoping it would assist me in my goal to make the world a better place. But after spending nearly seven years in the public school setting I realized pushing papers wasn’t going to do it. Read my story in “Thirteen Years Old in the Fourth Grade,” a ventilation on my experience. Now I am spreading my love through writing as an author and fictional biographer to young audiences. I want to encourage, bring truth, realization, and awe to all my readers. Visit arapperscollege.weebly.com today!

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Discussion

7 thoughts on “Occupy Education Today! (Guest Post by Hannah Faye)

  1. Great piece Hannah—when will policy makers get it? What about having an Occupy Education Day when we demonstrate the possibility of education that is best for children? We could set aside one day out of the entire school year where students and teachers determine what to discover. We could celebrate the day with a healthy, nutritious lunch eaten wherever the learning is taking place. Classes could explore their community, clean up a neighborhood park, work in food banks, create a mural, put on a show about their education, participate in a protest, put on a school feast….., the list could go on and on. We need to raise awareness of the possibilities of meaningful and transformational education—-education that has for the past couple of decades been strangled out of the system. Of course, no mandated testing, no teaching out of scripted, “teacher-proof” programs, no subsidized, processed food are allowed!!!!

    Posted by Francesca Blueher | December 22, 2011, 8:35 pm
  2. “Just think about this for a moment: in one day, if all teachers took a stand and stayed home, if all parents did the same thing and kept their children home…what message would that send to the government about the needs? How quickly would they get the message? This is the power we have when we toss aside our personal agendas for the moment and unify as a collective body for the future. This is the power we have when we choose to stop being controlled and start taking back the control and right to our own education!”

    A day without school…This is a powerful idea.

    Posted by Kirsten | December 23, 2011, 6:03 am
  3. Learning is extremely imperative for us for the reason that our future is depends on better edification
    ____________________

    Posted by steve | December 23, 2011, 6:44 am
  4. Or how about Occupy Classrooms…..where we (students, teachers, parents) take over our classrooms again?

    Posted by Francesca Blueher | December 23, 2011, 10:07 am
  5. Here’s some questions I thought of that need to be answered: 1. What is an appropriate day to plan the demonstration? 2. How will the word get out appropriately to parents, students and teachers about the idea and cause? 3. How will they be encouraged to be apart of this? (I suggest a survey.) 4. Will they be completely absent from school the whole day or half day? 5. Will there be any other activities to participate in on that day? And if so, what will they be? 6. How will the purpose be appropriately stated and carried out? And finally, I think the demonstration needs to have consensus…what are we asking for first? Shorter school hours, lesser subjects? Remember, we need to think “future”….how we want to make things to be better, and not just for ourselves. What do you think?

    Posted by Hannah Faye | December 24, 2011, 11:17 am
  6. I too am a product of the Chicago public school system; albeit nearly 20 years ago. :) Things have definitely changed.

    I think this movement is much needed and I’m really happy to see it’s continuing growth.

    Posted by Beth | December 28, 2011, 10:43 am
  7. Here is a post suggesting very similar ideas. What if we could coordinate a day for teachers and students dissatisfied with education to boycott school and meet up elsewhere for a conversation between everyone on what education should be? ‘http://educoup.wordpress.com/2012/11/13/unoccupy-schools-to-occupy-minds/’

    Posted by bernardtullassa | November 19, 2012, 3:10 pm

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