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Philosophical Meanderings

This category contains 337 posts

#HowILearn: a Post Request from @AnseoAMuinteoir

A group of educators, including me, were challenged recently by @AnseoAMuinteoir, aka Hellie Bullock of Ireland, to write a post on #HowILearn for her blog. Asking “how I learn” begins for me with a question of “what is learning?” It’s followed by a question of “why learn?” Since ground zero of memory, I feel I’ve … Continue reading

Collaborate, but collaborate better than thy neighbor(?).

Originally posted at educatedtodeath.com We’ve had several meetings this year that have all had a similar message: “create a competitive environment in your classroom to motive your students”. We are told that they respond well to competition. They should always strive to do better than their neighbor. We are also expected to tell them that … Continue reading

The pursuit, not the telling

We had already put up the computers; we stood around waiting for the tornado drill. I spun two wheels, one wheel on each of the skateboards parked on the desk by the door. The blue wheel on the first deck easily outlasted the white wheel on the other. You could hear the difference. The white … Continue reading

Learned Humanity

While in DC a couple of weeks ago for the Bammy Awards I had the chance to tour the Holocaust Museum with a few colleagues. It was powerful, moving, and saddening. I left convinced more than ever that what we do matters, and matters mightily. Wandering the beautifully and hauntingly constructed museum, the visceral taste of … Continue reading

Dichotomy of Co-Intentional Teaching and Our Current Education System

Last week I attended a national conference on theatre education.  It was an illuminating and frustrating experience.  And this fall, I started attending graduate school in applied theatre at CUNY in New York, where I am participating in a wonderfully illuminating course, Group Theatre.  Part of the ongoing dialogue and work in Group Theatre has … Continue reading

What if:

The most significant result of “teaching” is the teacher learning far more than students? Students learn not by what, how, when or why one might teach them, but by and through the processes they follow in formulating answers to questions posed to them? All the adults who learned within the constraints of a system involving … Continue reading

Standing the chance

As an early career teacher, I spent many first days of school immersed in administrative trivia and consequence. I expected many children to immerse themselves likewise in the rules, regulations, expectations, and ritual of establishing my nominally benevolent dictatorship over my classroom. I had a name for every desk configuration-my favorite was called the Roman … Continue reading

5 ways to flip school

This is a companion piece to “5 ways to flip composition” on the Democratizing Composition blog, a new project meant to build a community around the idea of broadening what’s possible in schools through specific new media methods and materials. I hope some of these suggestions strike a chord with you and that you’ll offer … Continue reading

A Students Response to Mitt Romney’s: A Chance for Every Child

First off, education is not a privilege. Education is something that is to be thought of as a right, a requirement, and a necessity. Education is something that we owe to children and adults for success both today and tomorrow. When you deny the right to access education, you are denying the right to live … Continue reading

Choosing Our Battles: Standing By the Communities We Seek to Challenge

This is an article which recently appeared on my blog RADICAL FAGGOT, which David asked me to consider reposting here on the Co-op. Though this piece does not directly address education, it does ask questions about how we negotiate our allegiances to multiple and sometimes conflicting communities and struggles. I would be interested to learn … Continue reading

Are we leaving LGBTQ and Pansexual students behind?

Youth deserve the right to be educated, to educate, to be empowered, and to empower, regardless of their sexual, racial, religious, or ethnical identities. They furthermore deserve the right to feel safe and protected in an environment that lets them be themselves without any fear of intimidation or unchecked ignorance. While the US has come … Continue reading

Spelling Being (Guest Post by cian saywer)

A couple of months ago, a very reluctant participant in the school spelling bee – my daughter Lauryn – went on stage and spelled for 26 rounds.  After about eight rounds, it was between her and one other person.  Every time she stepped up to the microphone and the word was given to her – … Continue reading

My Vision for Urban Education (Guest Post by Mark Naison)

I am extremely critical of current trends in education policy which involve deluging schools with standardized tests and rating teachers, administrators and whole institutions based on test result. Such policies result in school disengagement on the part of students, destroy teacher morale, and magnify health problems in poor and working class communities by crowding out … Continue reading

The Relationship Between Poverty and Educational Opportunities (Guest Post by Alejandrina Franco)

“The only way out of poverty is through a great education.” This is what my parents told me throughout my life. My mother only went to school as far as 6th grade. My father went as far as 8th grade. Both had to stop going to school in order to help their families. Like most … Continue reading

Teaching in the Dark Times of Corp Edu-Reform (Guest Post by G. A. Steele)

(First written September of 2011 updated and revised June 2012)   Long, long ago, before the dark times of the federal education takeover, first with NCLB law during the reign of Bush II, which was soon followed by the bait-and-switch corporate edu-reform days of RTTT during the reign of Obama, teachers had the freedom to … Continue reading

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