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Edreform

This tag is associated with 25 posts

The Third Way

“The Third Way” is a phrase sometimes used to describe a new, third alternative after two somewhat opposite alternatives are explored and found wanting or inadequate. For example, the historical Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, founded a way of life, an eightfold path, that was a “third way” after he rejected the excesses of indulgence on the … Continue reading

An Appeal.

This is a repost from my blog, Transparent Curriculum, from February. This is an appeal. Today the nationwide discussion is, and has been about accountability. Accountability for schools, for teachers, for students. Since the passage of NCLB, and ESEA before that – we have seen testing become the vehicle for how we assess accountability in … Continue reading

5-15 Reports :: Learning from our Students

One of my former colleagues recently posted this in our Facebook group. We used to use this technique to get our creative juices flowing vis-à-vis product development and corporate strategy in the educational software world. I’m still a believer that the seeds of great ideas often come from places you wouldn’t expect. And, even though … Continue reading

Revolution Tools

Got this on Twitter this morning–Revolution Tools–and chuckled at the image…but then acknowledged in my mind how Twitter has indeed revolutionized my professional sharing and growing, and I began thinking of the revolution tools I now use in my classroom. My learning space has changed dramatically since last year. I still have tables and chairs, … Continue reading

Wake me up, America: zip codes, destiny, & the rebirth of self-determination

In education we talk a lot about zip codes: “Zip codes and demographics must no longer be educational destiny for our students.” – Robert Carreon, Executive Director of Teach for America – Rio Grande Valley “[It was the ] biggest social injustice that skin color and zip code determined a child’s education and future opportunity.” … Continue reading

But I am Pagliacci

A politician walks into a bar and says, “These kids just aren’t learning.” So the bartender says, “What are you gonna do?” And the politician says, “Send them somewhere else.” And the bartender says, “Like Finland?” But the politician says, “Nah – that would never work.”

Cooperative Catalyst Presents: Kirsten Olson

Kirsten Olson is a leading writer in the U.S. describing education from a student’s point of view.  Her recent book Wounded By School: Recapturing the Joy in Learning and Standing Up To Old School Culture(2009) was one of the ten bestselling books at Teachers College Press this past year, and was nominated for Book of the Year … Continue reading

Cooperative Catalyst Presents: Dream School Commons

Jaime R. Wood is founder of Dream School Commons, a nonprofit organization with the mission of starting innovative low-cost or no-cost schools that serve populations in need. She is also the author of Living Voices: Multicultural Poetry in the Middle School Classroom (NCTE 2006). She started her teaching career working with middle school students in an alternative charter school … Continue reading

Occupy Wall Street: The Education Edition (Part 1)

I am very happy to say that I spent my weekend occupying Wall Street. During this time, I had the amazing opportunity to speak with people who are not only angry, but hopeful. They are individuals who protest our country’s economic policies not out of hatred, but out of love for our country. They see … Continue reading

Two ways we separate children & why we should care

My wife asked a great question this morning about what I mean when I say that schools sort kids. After all, she posited, isn’t differentiation a kind of sorting – and isn’t differentiation good? Differentiation is good when we negotiate ways for students to learn with students themselves. When we collaborate on ways to learn … Continue reading

#occupyedu: challenge schools to change

A simple truth lurks behind our schools: we built them to keep our kids apart. But we can do better. Join #occupyedu to share the countless, unique ways you challenge the status quo in public education. Children, parents, educators, community members – all are invited. We cannot re-imagine or recapture schools without the stakeholders they … Continue reading

Occupy your classroom

Michelle McNeil, reporting on ESEA Flexibility, September 28th, 2011: To be freed from [NCLB's 100% proficiency] 2014 deadline, and to have more flexibility in using Title I money, states will have to agree to do three main things. They will have to adopt college- and career-ready standards and tie state tests to them…. Arne Duncan … Continue reading

The garbage we sell kids

Although each of our civics classes is at a different place, each one engaged in some pretty compelling discussion this week. A few classes tackled excerpts from this video and wound up discussing separation of powers, property rights, rule of law, and zoning. In a fit of righteousness, we wound up co-writing this statement: I … Continue reading

Open Education: learning is at our fingertips

Over the past decade, there has been a steady rise in Open Courseware programs. Open Courseware is the concept of college courses being offered to the general public free of charge via the internet. The pioneer of the Open Courseware movement was MIT, who began this initiative in 2002. Soon, reputable universities such as Yale, … Continue reading

Do I have a right?

Author’s note – much of what you’re about to read is inspired by the juxtaposition of articles featured on BoingBoing. I spent this morning sharing iCivics and its marquee title, “Do I Have a Right?”, with local colleagues. “Do I Have a Right?” is an resource management game in which the player assumes control of … Continue reading

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