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Nurturing classrooms

This tag is associated with 11 posts

Cooperative Catalyst Presents: Kirsten Olson

Kirsten Olson is a leading writer in the U.S. describing education from a student’s point of view.  Her recent book Wounded By School: Recapturing the Joy in Learning and Standing Up To Old School Culture(2009) was one of the ten bestselling books at Teachers College Press this past year, and was nominated for Book of the Year … Continue reading

Rewards: motivating compliance or learning?

I sometimes pretend and say ‘Yay!’ – my 7 y/o daughter explaining how she learned to ‘comply’ in her school Incentive schemes, which are supposed to encourage desired behavior through the use of rewards, or discourage undesirable ones through punishments, are all too familiar to all of us. Probably similarly familiar are the findings that … Continue reading

Learning is transformational, can schooling come close?

After reading Gatto, I make a distinction between education and schooling. Schooling is, at least in its current form, a way to govern education, but more often than not, education can happen without it — as millions of home-schoolers in US and many other countries and numerous important people through history that didn’t go to school can … Continue reading

Learning is (supposed to be) fun, no?

My older daughter is a grade 1 student in a French Immersion school and this year the school emphasizes reading and writing basic sight words as one of the goals for the kids. While the first four months she brought no homework, starting this month, her class will do a regular dictation exercise at the … Continue reading

Please don’t take my blanket away!

As I was taking my younger daughter to her daycare this morning, making sure I don’t forget her favorite stuffed toy — Piglet, of Winnie the Pooh fame ;-) — a sequence of pictures flashed in front of my eyes: The warmth of our home, causing my brain to recall familiar smells from the baking … Continue reading

Scream when someone takes your spoon!

When I was invited to join this blog, I had lots of ideas what should my first post be about — death to subject silos, put a stop to age segregation, pull parents and even the community into the learning, etc. While I would still like to bring a parent perspective on these important topics, … Continue reading

Incidental Learning

I shared a lesson in Kindergarten on Sept. 17th which happened to be the 17th day of school for us. As I was walking down to the class, I realized that and that I taught Kindergarten for 17 years before moving on to other grade levels. Who cares about those 17s? Well, I do, because … Continue reading

20 Year Old Dinosaurs

Adam and Monika, this one’s for you, in response to your comment here and the ensuing conversation about learning. This is also cross-posted at Reflections of the TZSTeacher. When I taught kindergarten, I had a unit about dinosaurs. Young children are fascinated by dinosaurs.  I don’t know if it’s the “monster” connection, or the big … Continue reading

Do It From The Classroom

This week’s Cooperative Catalyst blog question mirrors an #Edchat twtpoll question:  How can teachers have a bigger influence on education reformation? One of my favorite songs relatively early in my career was by Whitney Houston, called: “Greatest Love Of All“ It began with these words: I believe the children are our are future Teach them … Continue reading

Learning Like Spies

How do we support students developing as efficacious self-directed, social learners and involve parents as partners in that journey? This is a question I ask myself daily. While I work in a progressive environment, there are certain methods that are not. There are thematic units, individual studies, and differentiated instruction, but there are also cookie … Continue reading

Teacher as Learning Platform

How do we support students developing as efficacious self-directed, social learners and involve parents as partners in that journey? I struggle with balancing expectations for student independence and inquiry with the patience and nurturing needed to help students graduate from school work to their own work. In my own life, I tend to make changes … Continue reading

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