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schooling

This tag is associated with 44 posts

Please don’t take my blanket away!

As I was taking my younger daughter to her daycare this morning, making sure I don’t forget her favorite stuffed toy — Piglet, of Winnie the Pooh fame ;-) — a sequence of pictures flashed in front of my eyes: The warmth of our home, causing my brain to recall familiar smells from the baking … Continue reading

Barry Schwartz on Practical Wisdom and How We Need This in Schools

I’m a big fan of Barry Schwartz, and his recent TED talk on our loss of wisdom just adds to my appreciation of him and his work. Take a look: Many of the issues he addresses in his short talk – teaching to tests, imprisoning people for non-violent acts – are ones I’ve written about … Continue reading

Scream when someone takes your spoon!

When I was invited to join this blog, I had lots of ideas what should my first post be about — death to subject silos, put a stop to age segregation, pull parents and even the community into the learning, etc. While I would still like to bring a parent perspective on these important topics, … Continue reading

The Problem With Our Newest Educational Manifesto

Take a look at this Educational Manifesto, created by a group of educational reformers and leaders and published in The Washington Post. As an educational reformer myself, I read this manifesto with great interest. There were parts I agreed with strongly. Such as this: “It’s time for all of the adults — superintendents, educators, elected … Continue reading

Let’s Have All Students Evaluate Their Teachers

In college, students finally get to evaluate their professors, but until then, there are few venues for a student to provide feedback on the teaching they receive. But long before college, students’ feedback would be useful, if we only sought it out. Unfortunately, there have been scant opportunities for students, even in high school, to … Continue reading

Ethics Without Indoctrination

In an essay entitled “Ethics Without Indoctrination” in a now 20-year-old issue of Educational Leadership, Richard W. Paul writes: “If we bring ethics into the curriculum – and we should – we must take pains to ensure that we do so in a morally unobjectionable manner. This requires us to distinguish clearly between espousing the … Continue reading

An Open Letter to Educators

Take a look at this YouTube video from Dan Brown: “An Open Letter to Educators”: Dan dropped out of college because, as he said, “my schooling was interfering with my education.” As he describes a typical college class and makes a passionate and positive plea for real education for the 21st century, do you find … Continue reading

If School is a Race to Nowhere, Where’s the Somewhere We Should Be Racing Toward?

I recently watched a screening of the film Race to Nowhere, about how the pressure on our children in school is making them so stressed out that they become sick and depressed and cheat with abandon. It’s a powerful film — one that every parent and teacher should watch. It’s also an interesting counterpoint to … Continue reading

Teaching for America? Teaching for the World

Tom Friedman’s op-ed in The New York Times, “Teaching for America,” is yet another cry for major reform of our education system, but this time with a twist: for the sake of national security. As Friedman writes: “When I came to Washington in 1988, the cold war was ending and the hot beat was national … Continue reading

We Need to Move Beyond Cookie-Cutter Schooling & Embrace Diversity in How We Educate Our Children

Although my mother knows that I read The New York Times online, if she sees an article of interest in her print copy, she cuts it out and sends it to me. Recently, she sent me an article about Brother Brian Carty, founder of the De La Salle Academy, a private middle school for the … Continue reading

Thinking in School?

In a recent Huffington Post essay, Eric Maisel presents an argument for adding thinking to school . His idea is simple. Carve out 45 minutes each day for students to ponder big (age-appropriate) questions, write down their thoughts, and present them if they wish. I like this idea, and I would take it further. Readers … Continue reading

What Will Future Generations Condemn Us For? How We Educate Our Children

In his excellent op-ed in the Washington Post, Princeton professor, Kwame Anthony Appiah, imagines what future generations will condemn us for, as we have condemned our ancestors for slavery and women’s disenfranchisement. Appiah mentions our prison systems, factory farming, and the isolation and institutionalization of our elderly. I think our descendants will also condemn us … Continue reading

Education is Not Indoctrination

There are some who argue that education is virtually always synonymous  with indoctrination, and those who hold this position certainly have  evidence to support it. The U.S. government removed native children from  their homes, put them in boarding schools, forbade them from speaking  their own languages, and indoctrinated them with very specific values  and beliefs. … Continue reading

Why Are We Afraid to Explore Issues Essential to Our Children’s Future?

Last May I had a busy day doing MOGO talks out of state. (MOGO stands for “most good,” a short way of thinking about what does the most good and the least harm, which is the basis of my book, Most Good, Least Harm: A Simple Principle for a Better World and Meaningful Life.) I … Continue reading

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