archives

Standardized tests

This tag is associated with 15 posts

I’m Angry

It’s Monday, and I’m angry. I’m angry because, after a weekend of careful planning, after differentiating an assignment for students who have mastered skills at different levels, after catching up on all of my grading, after getting my lesson plans in on time with the TEKS and the Reading Comprehension standards and the ELPS, I … Continue reading

The Evaluation: schooling at the end of teaching, unions, & care

Nearly sixth months ago, I posted “The Evaluation,” a near-future science fiction short story imagining public school teaching as day-labor inside a techno-bureaucratic panopticon. Since then, I’ve tried to hold myself accountable for posting about the work that my kids and I do together, which I love and in which I believe. I want to … Continue reading

The Third Way

“The Third Way” is a phrase sometimes used to describe a new, third alternative after two somewhat opposite alternatives are explored and found wanting or inadequate. For example, the historical Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, founded a way of life, an eightfold path, that was a “third way” after he rejected the excesses of indulgence on the … Continue reading

A Standardized Composition Test

We know bubble sheets are unrelated to “real life”. I think we made the “education thing” up by constructing much nonsense about the written word being the supreme method of sharing ideas and information. I think we have forgotten that sharing experiences and doing things together are matters that (1) allow us to learn and … Continue reading

50 Words You Should NOT Say on a Standardized Test

I wanted to share a recent post I wrote for Common Dreams, a progressive news site. Here’s an excerpt from “50 Words You Should NOT Say on a Standardized Test”: “… when I first read about the New York City’s department of education effort to ban 50 words from city-wide tests, I thought that I’d … Continue reading

Teacher, Test Thyself

A simple multiple-choice question. Only one answer is right. You must consider yourself a failed teacher if you do not answer correctly. You will be penalized for guessing. Which of the following is the correct view of education in the U.S.A.? A: B: C: Both the above. D: One of the above. E: None of … Continue reading

Making Work to Make Class Work

I did not take any “test prep” courses until facing the Bar Exam which, in Michigan, involves the Multistate Bar Exam (an engineered, multiple-guess device) used in tandem with written essay questions to determine whether individuals should, or should not, be licensed to practice law. A sufficiently high Multistate score results in “passing” without a … Continue reading

“No” does not mean “NO”, and I am snarky…

I was recently advised that “no” does not mean “NO”, and that I am “snarky”. I re-learned the meaning of “no” through The Bartleby Project . I support the effort to “Just Say No” to the test and so I added my head to that project’s count. I even added my two cents-worth of thought… … Continue reading

Magical Forests, Growth Models, and School Reform

I sit watching the educational debate unfold in front of my eyes and the current tenor of the debate has focused on prescribing a method that will achieve the end result of high test scores.  There are some that believe if we create a uniform set of procedures, scripts and decision-making trees; giving them to … Continue reading

The future of big box schooling

I recently posted my thoughts on Schooling the World, an important film that takes a look at the value of bringing Western-style education to sustainable indigenous cultures and beyond. I personally — and as I mentioned in my post, it seems Sir Ken Robinson too — believe the film raises many important questions which are … Continue reading

Scream when someone takes your spoon!

When I was invited to join this blog, I had lots of ideas what should my first post be about — death to subject silos, put a stop to age segregation, pull parents and even the community into the learning, etc. While I would still like to bring a parent perspective on these important topics, … Continue reading

Joy in Standardized Tests?

Much of the conversation in response to this weeks’ blog posts has centered around joy in learning and joy in school. Here’s my story of this past week. I am my school’s testing coordinator.  This is my first year doing it and we are doing all of our state tests online.  I am coordinating 10 … Continue reading

Some resolve & a little switch

Before I talk about how I got here, let me try to describe where here is. I stand for Student choice. Democratic education. Authentic project-based, service, and entrepreneurial learning and feedback. Schools that function as nodes for learning opportunities. Extending students unabridged rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness at school. Extending teachers … Continue reading

What Was Life Like Before Standards And High Stakes State Tests?

First, let me give credit to Becky Fisher (@beckyfisher73 on Twitter, who blogs at The Calculus of the  Classroom) for her help with this post. She brilliantly uncorked the thoughts and opinions expressed here. As I read “Subverting Myself” and “Start Doing The Minimum…And The Maximum” it occurred to me that I have been teaching … Continue reading

Schools Must Become Democratic Institutions

In a democracy, public education should promote models and policies for schools that provide students direct, personal experience with democratic ideals of choice, equality, freedom, and shared power. As much as we want to “teach content” and “cover curriculum,” we can’t drop out of the sky into students’ pre-exisitng communities and the midst of their … Continue reading

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