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Authentic Assessment

This tag is associated with 13 posts

Cooperative Catalyst Presents: Kirsten Olson

Kirsten Olson is a leading writer in the U.S. describing education from a student’s point of view.  Her recent book Wounded By School: Recapturing the Joy in Learning and Standing Up To Old School Culture(2009) was one of the ten bestselling books at Teachers College Press this past year, and was nominated for Book of the Year … Continue reading

Occupy Wall Street: The Education Edition (Part 1)

I am very happy to say that I spent my weekend occupying Wall Street. During this time, I had the amazing opportunity to speak with people who are not only angry, but hopeful. They are individuals who protest our country’s economic policies not out of hatred, but out of love for our country. They see … Continue reading

I learn for a living!

Recently, a blogger friend commented on my personal blog: “It is hard to imagine myself as a once great curious and academically thriving student!” When I read that I had hard time thinking of a meaningful answer, but I think I have one after attending http://edcampvancouver.org yesterday! Bunch of educators gathered together to discuss various topics, among … Continue reading

Hi, Teaching Ambassador Fellows. It’s me, Chad.

David (@dloitz)suggested that Coöp write towards this post and call from the USDOE’s Teaching Ambassador Fellows (TAF). The Fellows have asked teachers, “What is the biggest challenge in education today?” The biggest challenge in education today is its myopia and disregard for real-world problem-solving as concretized in our collective and sometimes willful lack of imagination … Continue reading

“I’m going to be as forthcoming as I can be, Mr. Anderson.”

Forget prison; school is the Matrix. When you look at a kid, what do you see? A genius? A business person? An artist? A leader? Someone to lift up? Someone who lifts you? Someone to limit? Someone to control? Someone you love? Someone who fills you with dread? Someone who could be doing so much … Continue reading

Time to Explore Passions in School?

Our county has this time in school in many of our elementary schools called Mastery Extension time or Extended Learning Time–a 30-45 minute time period in EVERY class where Title 1 pullout may happen, sometimes gifted pullout happens, remedial pullout happens and the idea is for kids to get extra time on something they either … Continue reading

Practical Praxis

Continuing our focus of identifying alternative narratives to the testing and accountability rhetoric of current reform efforts, I wish to put forth the Common Ground Charter School in New Haven, Connecticut as an example of how we can do education differently. Common Ground focuses on sustainability, Through challenging interdisciplinary block classes and core academic classes, … Continue reading

We need better PR

How do we organize? Who are the spokespeople? To whom do they speak? How do kids and parents voice their wants and needs? Can they drive this revolution? How do we break into urban ed? Who are our allies there? Which administrators will back our work and make it “safe” for others to join? As … Continue reading

Start Doing The Minimum…And The Maximum

I’m a big fan of doing the minimum…and the maximum. The key is understanding at which point doing “the minimum” is better than doing “the maximum” and when doing “the maximum” is absolutely necessary. Here are two examples: Do the minimum when you write your lesson plans. I’m not saying don’t plan, and I am … Continue reading

Why Can’t My Kids’ Writing Be Proof They Can Write?

This week’s question:    How might we leverage or scale up authentic assessment models to challenge (or supplant, I add) standardized, high stakes tests? 1.  First, make sure teachers have a clue what authentic assessment is. 2.  Then, make sure teachers understand deeply what authentic assessment is. 3.  Be sure to check whether teachers know … Continue reading

Moral Assessment and Compromise

High stakes testing is a broken system. It is an industry, not an education. It’s a sorting mechanism, not a driver of equity. It discourages differentiation. It discourages student and teacher discretion in learning. It perpetuates low-level learning with crude pass/fail punishment and reward systems. It’s inauthentic. We didn’t start with a blank slate, design … Continue reading

Public Education is Anything but Free

This is not a very complex issue to date. Systematically, our public education system has been about training students to sit still and listen to the information politicians, administrators, and teachers have determined is important for them to know. Their job is then to repeat back that information to confirm its transmission. Our current educational … Continue reading

Standardizing Democracy-Part 2

The Light Side Now that I have purged most of my skepticism, please allow me the opportunity to express how common core standards may facilitate a move towards a more democratic education system. First of all, as others have mentioned, having national standards will remove roadblocks in interstate collaboration and information sharing. This will assist … Continue reading

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