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Educational transformation

This tag is associated with 15 posts

The Mars problem

We operate schools that used biased means to “identify” and separate out the scientists and astronauts we need to colonize and terraform Mars. We need schools that knit together the communities that will lift up and let go of the all the people going there. We operate schools that enable total war. We need schools … Continue reading

5-15 Reports :: Learning from our Students

One of my former colleagues recently posted this in our Facebook group. We used to use this technique to get our creative juices flowing vis-à-vis product development and corporate strategy in the educational software world. I’m still a believer that the seeds of great ideas often come from places you wouldn’t expect. And, even though … Continue reading

On hope and action

I have concentrated less on the blogosphere lately and more on conversations in and around smaller, more immediate issues and opportunities than wholesale educational transformation – for which I feel a certain amount of ennui at present, but not so much in the “boredom” sense of the word. I am kind of stuck in the … Continue reading

Once Upon a Time We Put a Human on the Moon

Despite complaints that NCLB has reduced classrooms to one-size-fits all test prep environments, my perspective is that our classrooms have mostly always been, with a few exceptions, one-size-fits all teaching spaces. In working at all three levels of Pk-12, elementary educators do seem more likely to create spaces where students have resource material choices, opportunities … Continue reading

Wake me up, America: zip codes, destiny, & the rebirth of self-determination

In education we talk a lot about zip codes: “Zip codes and demographics must no longer be educational destiny for our students.” – Robert Carreon, Executive Director of Teach for America – Rio Grande Valley “[It was the ] biggest social injustice that skin color and zip code determined a child’s education and future opportunity.” … Continue reading

But I am Pagliacci

A politician walks into a bar and says, “These kids just aren’t learning.” So the bartender says, “What are you gonna do?” And the politician says, “Send them somewhere else.” And the bartender says, “Like Finland?” But the politician says, “Nah – that would never work.”

Two ways we separate children & why we should care

My wife asked a great question this morning about what I mean when I say that schools sort kids. After all, she posited, isn’t differentiation a kind of sorting – and isn’t differentiation good? Differentiation is good when we negotiate ways for students to learn with students themselves. When we collaborate on ways to learn … Continue reading

Do I have a right?

Author’s note – much of what you’re about to read is inspired by the juxtaposition of articles featured on BoingBoing. I spent this morning sharing iCivics and its marquee title, “Do I Have a Right?”, with local colleagues. “Do I Have a Right?” is an resource management game in which the player assumes control of … Continue reading

Learners ≠ consumers

Since returning from #ISTE11, I’ve struggled with writing about education. Given the tanked economy, our retrograde, juvenile government, and the epidemic breakout of strong-man/yes–man/straw-man educational dictatorships, I’ve felt a bit like Margot from “All Summer in a Day.” We are living and working in a playground battlefield. It’s insane. In response, we need to make … Continue reading

The big us

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has published its findings after a years-long investigation of “suspicious scores” in Atlanta schools. The Journal-Constitution found that over 170 educators – including over three dozen principals – had falsified student answers in 44 of the 56 schools scrutinized in the probe. In a PBS News Hour interview, Heather Vogell, a reporter … Continue reading

Join the Coöp

Several Coöp members and friends at #ISTE 11 have asked me about the beginning of our work, so I’d like to share out these founders’ reflections that Adam, Paula, and I wrote earlier in the year: “Beacon of Hope” by Adam. “A Year in the Life…” by Paula. “Who the hell am I and what … Continue reading

It’s a mess – and it’ll be great

I greatly admire Adam, his conviction, and his advocacy. When I saw him begin a conversation with Diane Ravitch, I jumped in, hoping that Ravitch would take my interest as incentive to respond to Adam. I wish all of our national leaders would spend some time discussing learning and stewardship with him. Ravitch did reply, … Continue reading

The summer of our discontent

[This is a cross-post from Classroots.org, which is a blog about reforming classroom practice. Here the post is addressed to every community member invested in educational transformation, and whether or not there should be such a distinction or such a disclaimer as this are questions ripe for comment and debate.] Transforming our schools will take … Continue reading

Sunday afternoons, Slow Cooking and Modern Schooling

If you ever want to catch me at my most relaxed and “tuned in”, drop over on a Sunday afternoon. At about 1:30, you’ll find me in the kitchen, working at preparing an inviting, comfortable family dinner. If you catch me in the early stages of the process, the counters will be clean, the sink … Continue reading

The curriculum treadmill

I can still smell the high school weight room. I remember the day I tore my shorts (but not my boxers, thank goodness) squatting 455 pounds. Not a lot you can do in that situation, even if the captains of the girls’ soccer team are at the quad machine behind you. My strength coach (a … Continue reading

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